FAQ’s

.....and answers that will assist us reach a shared understanding

Useful Links

At vulputate quam blandit
eget quam
www.websiteaddress.maori.nz

At vulputate quam blandit
eget quam
www.websiteaddress.maori.nz

At vulputate quam blandit
eget quam
www.websiteaddress.maori.nz

Council-Maori relationships

What does strength-ening Council–Maori engagement involve?

What does strengthening Council–Maori engagement involve?   There are many practical ways that councils and Maori organisations can improve their engagement with one another. Lasting and meaningful engagement is built through working together across a range of areas and activities. This involves long-term investment in relationships and a comprehensive approach to policy and activities, rather than interaction on an issue by issue basis.   Strengthening Council–Maori engagement involves:
  • Increasing understanding – building the capability of councils to engage with Maori communities. Examples in this area are focused on awareness, knowledge and understanding
  • Enhancing relationships – developing lasting and meaningful relationships. This involves formal and informal interaction across a wide range of activities and issues and supporting Maori capacity building
  • Building stronger communities – working together to develop and deliver policies, programmes and services that promote the well-being of Maori communities and the wider community.
  Council–Maori engagement is enhanced when there are positive developments in all areas - Increasing Understanding, Enhancing Relationships and Building Stronger Communities.   Adapted from: www.lgnz.co.nz/library/publications/FAQs_Maori.pdf      
 
 

What are councils’ stat-utory responsibilities to Maori under the RMA?

The RMA promotes the sustainable management of natural and physical resources in a way that enables communities to provide for their environmental, social, economic and cultural well-being. The RMA contains specific provisions for consulting and working with tangata whenua. Local authorities are required to consult with iwi authorities when preparing or changing regional policy statements, regional plans and district plans, and engage tangata whenua in other resource management decisions in order to fulfil their Treaty responsibilities. Consultation is a practical means of ensuring that the Crown and other bodies with responsibilities under the legislation are properly informed to enable them to act consistently with the principles of the Treaty. Effective tangata whenua participation in local government decision-making on resource management matters is an essential element of the successful implementation of the RMA, and the achievement of good environmental outcomes.   Adapted from: www.lgnz.co.nz/library/publications/FAQs_Maori.pdf  
 
 

Engagement

What does engagement with Maori mean?

Engagement is the range of activities that local government may undertake in order to interact and communicate with Maori. Engagement is about working in a relationship to achieve mutually valued aims. It involves direct interaction and is more than simply passing and receiving information. Engagement involves a number of activities and occurs across a spectrum from low to high involvement, including: · information sharing · consultation · joint action · shared decision-making · co-management.   Adapted from: www.lgnz.co.nz/library/publications/FAQs_Maori.pdf  
 
 

Iwi management plans

What is the statutory recognition for an iwi management plan?

The Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) describes an iwi management plan (IMP) as "…a relevant planning document recognised by an iwi authority and lodged with the council". Section 2 of the Act defines an iwi authority as "the authority which represents an iwi and which is recognised by that iwi as having authority to do so". IMPs must be taken into account when preparing or changing regional policy statements and regional and district plans (sections 61(2A)(a), 66(2A)(a), and 74(2A) (see FAQ What does it mean to 'take into account ' an iwi management plan when preparing or changing a plan?). The RMA is silent on how IMPs are developed, and they therefore assume a variety of shapes and forms. The RMA establishes three criteria for IMPs to be taken into account when making plans under the RMA; they must be:  recognised by an iwi authority  relevant to the resource management issues of the region/district  lodged with the relevant council(s). A number of provisions within the RMA provide for Māori interests in resource management. IMPs can assist in implementation of the Act by:  guiding councils in giving effect to Part 2, particularly sections 6(e), 6(f), 6(g), 7(a), and 8  informing the preparation or change of regional policy statements and regional and district plans  informing the preparation and assessment of applications for resource consent. Iwi planning documents are also provided for under s.16 of the Fisheries (Kaimoana Customary Fishing) Regulations 1998 and s.16 of the Fisheries (South Island Customary Fishing) Regulations 1999. Link: From ‘The RMA Quality Planning Resource’. For other frequently asked questions on Iwi Management Plans see... http://www.qualityplanning.org.nz/index.php/supporting-components/faq-s-on-iwi-management-plans
 
 

What does it mean to 'take into account' an iwi management plan?

What does it mean to 'take into account' an iwi management plan when preparing or changing a plan? Having identified the relevant factors for decision-making, the Courts have held that the obligation to 'take into account' an iwi management plan (IMP) consists of a number of elements:
  • weigh the relevant factors being considered
  • effect a balance between these factors that is appropriate to the circumstances
  • be able to show that you have done so.
While there has been no specific ruling on its meaning in terms of IMPs under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA), the elements above provide some useful prompts for councils preparing plans. The RMA further qualifies the words 'take into account' with 'to the extent that its content has a bearing on the resource management issues of the district'. This infers that there may be circumstances where some of the material contained in an IMP may not be relevant for RMA purposes. 'Take into account' also infers that the policy direction contained in an IMP may not be in line with the most appropriate policies or methods in terms of section 32 evaluations. Whangarei District Council has prepared Guidelines for preparing and Taking into Account Iwi and Hapū Environmental Management Plans (PDF 106KB) (September 2006). The Council defines 'taking into account' to mean the IMP "must be shown to have input into the planning process and to have been incorporated into Council's decision making".   Link: From ‘The RMA Quality Planning Resource’. For other frequently asked questions on Iwi Management Plans see... http://www.qualityplanning.org.nz/index.php/supporting-components/faq-s-on-iwi-management-plans
 
 

Relationship benefits

What are the benefits of building good relation-ships with Maori?

Councils have statutory responsibilities to engage with Maori and to recognise the Treaty of Waitangi. Apart from these requirements, there is an increasing understanding that early and meaningful engagement with one another can result in more informed decision-making, more streamlined processes, and better quality outcomes. For both Maori organisations and councils, closer engagement can contribute to:
  • a greater understanding of one another’s expectations and aspirations
  • increased opportunities to establish shared projects and joint ventures
  • improved processes based on an understanding of one another’s priorities,
  • expectations, and available resources
  • more efficient and effective use of council and Maori resources
  • supporting Mori expectations and aspirations in order to promote the well-being of Maori and the wider community.
Maori input to council decision-making can also help councils to ensure that their services are relevant to, and accessible by, Maori communities. Adapted from: www.lgnz.co.nz/library/publications/FAQs_Maori.pdf  
 
 
Key idea: "At the end of the day, the questions we ask ourselves determine the type of people we become." Leo Babauta

Panui

Suspendisse fringilla metus »
December 12, 2012

News article »
December 12, 2012

Forum

test »
329 comments

Proactive »
2 comments

Subscribe to eNEWS

Aenean nec nibh augue, at tincidunt elit. Nullam dui elit, tincidunt non faucibus… »